Shepherd’s House open for business: non-residential facility to begin working with clients Monday

Kendra Peek/kendra.peek@amnews.com Magistrate Phil Sammons and Deputy Jailer Brian Wofford look at the closet, which will be used to store clothing and other items for the participants of Shepherd's House.

Kendra Peek/kendra.peek@amnews.com
Magistrate Phil Sammons and Deputy Jailer Brian Wofford look at the closet, which will be used to store clothing and other items for the participants of Shepherd’s House.

On Monday, for the first time, 17-20 men will enter the non-residential substance abuse treatment facility for former inmates, located in the former Red Cross building at 454 S. Third Street.

They will be the first clients of Shepherd’s House, the company running the program, to step foot in the facility. It’s a program officials say Boyle and Mercer counties have needed for some time and something they hope will make a difference.

“I think it will make a difference … I think this is definitely a step in the right direction,” said Brian Wofford, Boyle County deputy jailer, during the facility’s open house on Friday. “Incarceration alone has proven not to work.”

In the Shepherd’s House, former inmates of the Boyle County Detention Center from Boyle and Mercer counties  will be able to continue receiving treatment for their drug or alcohol addiction. Other services at the facility will include Al-anon, Narcotics Anonymous, and Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, Celebrate Recovery meetings, and more.

Kendra Peek/kendra.peek@amnews.com Patsy Harmon, office manager of Shepherd's House, left, and Lisa Rousey, right, during the open house on Friday.

Kendra Peek/kendra.peek@amnews.com
Patsy Harmon, office manager of Shepherd’s House, left, and Lisa Rousey, right, during the open house on Friday.

“It’s amazing how it’s all coming together,” said Pastor James Hunn, director of the Circle of Hope, a ministry run by Hope Network.

Circle of Hope also has an office in the house, where clients will be paired with a mentor, given help with job placement and assistance getting clothing.

“It’s a start. We can invest back in people,” Hunn said.

Those who need it will be able to complete their GED. Clients will also develop their interviewing, resumé-building and other soft skills.

Kentucky Counseling Associates, which will soon be opening an office on Third Street in Danville, will also have offices in the facility, and will be providing the counseling and case management for the program.

“We’re excited to help out,” said Amber Wood Love, business manager and therapist at Kentucky Counseling Associates.

Follow Kendra Peek on Twitter, @knpeek.

Kendra Peek/kendra.peek@amnews.com Jailer Barry Harmon, Deputy Jailer Brian Wofford, Magistrate Jack Hendricks and community member Tina Cox chat in the meeting space during the open house of Shepherd's House.

Kendra Peek/kendra.peek@amnews.com
Jailer Barry Harmon, Deputy Jailer Brian Wofford, Magistrate Jack Hendricks and Tina Cox, legal assistant at the Boyle County Attorney’s office, chat in the meeting space during the open house of Shepherd’s House.