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Danville seniors get to see their family — from a safe distance

COVID can’t rain on this parade

 

Lots of love was shared between Morning Pointe residents and their families Friday afternoon, even though they couldn’t give hugs and kisses because of COVID-19 pandemic restrictions.

At 2 p.m., an unusual parade of vehicles lined up as residents sat in comfy chairs outside in the warm sunshine, spaced at least six-feet apart, and anxiously waited with their signs they had made the day before, which were to let their families know they were doing OK.

At least 60 vehicles of families and friends slowly made their way around the drive, honking horns, waving, and yelling “Hi” and “I love you!”

Some brought their own homemade signs and even pets to brighten up the day for the senior residents. Even passing vehicles on the nearby highway saw the colorful scene and honked horns too.

“Mama, I love you!” said one man as he drove by wiping tears from his eyes.

The son of Morning Pointe resident Paulie Hanks surprised his mother when he and his family drove from West Virginia just to be in the parade and show their love.

Many families held out their phones and recorded the scene when they saw their loved ones. One son surprised Paulie Hanks by driving from West Virginia with his family just to catch a glimpse of his mother. After they had passed, Hanks kept saying she couldn’t believe they were there.

Tabitha Teague, community relations director at Morning Pointe, said the residents were so excited about the parade.

“It’s an emotional time for our families and residents,” she said.

The parade was fun and lifted everyone’s spirits, she said. Plus, “It was an opportunity to get a visual and actually see that Mom’s OK.”

Paulie Hanks reacts with surprise when she sees her son and family drive by in the family parade at Morning Pointe Friday afternoon. They had driven from West Virginia for the surprise. Hanks’ sign read, “Miss you! Wish you were here.”

The son of Morning Pointe resident Paulie Hanks surprised his mother when he and his family drove from West Virginia just to be in the parade and show their love.

Marlys Marincel

Joe Marincel

Ernest Long holds up a sign during a family and friends parade at Morning Pointe Friday afternoon.

Berdine Reed

Tom Thompson

Ernie “Coach” Trosper

Berdine Reed