• 66°

It’s not all about our comfort
Get a COVID test for yourself, and for those you love

I’ve washed my hands a thousand times in recent weeks, and I hope you have, too.

Hand sanitizer is something I’ve always used, but lately, I’ve gone through more than my fair share.

And yes, I wear a mask almost everywhere I go.

If you’ve been near me in a store or anywhere in public, you may have noticed that I kept my distance – at least 6 feet of it – and if someone got a little closer than I thought was a good idea, I politely slid away a little.

With COVID-19 running rampant, it’s all about precaution. I’m taking every step possible to be safe and make sure I not only don’t acquire the disease, but in the event I do so, I want to make sure I’m not spreading any germs that could give it to someone who may be vulnerable to COVID-19 and other illnesses. My dad is one of those people, and my family and I have been very careful to make sure we aren’t endangering his health. He had a heart transplant a few years ago, so we have to be even more careful since his immune system is more susceptible to illness.

Although I had taken all of the common precautions, the one step I still needed to take was being tested. I’ll admit I have a very low pain threshold, so the thought of a long swab on the end of a wooden stick making its way into my nasal cavity wasn’t a pleasant thought. But I knew it was important, and I wanted to take that step. At some point.

While working on a story about COVID-19 testing, the opportunity to be tested presented itself, and with little time to think about it, I just said, “I’ll do it.”

The lady administering the test told me it would be “relatively painless” but also “very discomforting.” Let me tell you, she hit the nail on the head. While it didn’t actually hurt, the pressure of the swab is far past the point I would call comfortable. But sometimes we have to do things, and it’s not always about our comfort.

With my test completed, I now wait. I was told the test results would be given to me by phone within 24 to 72 hours, so I should know something by the weekend. I have no symptoms, so I’m not really worried about the test, but I have considered the fact that I could be asymptomatic, and if I am, it’s better to know and be able to help protect others by quarantining myself than accidentally passing the disease to someone else who could become ill, or perhaps even die because of something I gave them.

The experience was not so bad in the big picture, and it’s definitely worth it for the health of my family and others I come in contact with, and I hope that if you haven’t been tested, you will do so. And if not, please, at least be sure to practice all of the other safety measures, and wear a mask. If you don’t do it for yourself, think of someone you love and do it for them.