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From our files, Aug. 21, 2020

100 YEARS AGO — 1920

 

Business has been at a standstill for hours at a time in Danville as a result of the breaking down of the machinery at the electric light plant here the past few days. There has been one mishap after another and G.A. Irvine, the local manager, has been working night and day in an effort to furnish the city with light and power. The plant has four engines, but on account of inefficient workmen and shortage of help, it has almost been impossible to keep the plant in operation. Two of the units are entirely out of commission and the other two have had breakdowns almost daily.

 

Clarence “Chicken” Adams, of Junction City, is once again in the Boyle county jail after an adventure in Lexington Saturday night. A. Chenault accused Adams of breaking into his home and maliciously carrying off his entire clothing outfit. Not satisfied with this, Chicken allegedly struck a Lexington taxi driver over the head and took his pistol and $30. Chicken has a unique way of outfitting himself. Two years ago he stripped a man in the Danville train station of his clothing and shoes while he was asleep. When the traveler awoke, he discovered to his dismay that he was clad in nothing by a suit of B.V.D’s.

 

As was indicated a few days ago, H.J. Perry, who has been a clerk in the Danville post office for the past 20 years, was retired from his position on a pension of $400 a year. Mr. Perry’s many friends will regret to know that he is compelled to give up the position he has so long and so efficiently held. He will probably engage in other business in Danville.

 

The formal opening of the Danville Golf Club took place yesterday when a reception was given for over 100 members and their families. Golf and croquet games were played. At 6 o’clock an enjoyable buffet was served by Tom Parks of the Parks Ice Cream Parlor. The local players have been on the grounds daily for the past week, but have not become experts, even if some of them think so. The first of next week an expert golf player fromLouisville will be here and teach the game to members of the club.

 

With good weather conditions,local aviation enthusiasts will witness a rare Air Carnival Sunday afternoon on the G.M. Jones farm, on Lancaster Pike, one mile from the city. A giant two-passenger plane arrived here today from the Aero Club in Jellico, Tennessee.

 

75 YEARS AGO — 1945

 

The first derby, being worn well in advance of the fall season, was spotted yesterday by a Perryville resident who had come “to the city” on a shopping tour. While it’s not unusual for the ladies to rush the season, by wearing fall millinery in August, it is something out of the ordinary for a man to try to beat the fashion calendar.

 

One of the most important meetings of the Kiwanis this year, will be when the Danville club will pay tribute to the men and women of America who have aided the war efforts on the home front. It will be held at noon in the Begley banquet rooms of the Gilcher Hotel. Kiwanis clubs across the nation will hold similar sessions to extend the tribute to home front laborers.

 

Captain Zdenka Hurianek, MC, only woman doctor ever to be assigned to Darnall General Hospital in Boyle County, left the military facility this month for Camp Beal where she was processed prior to her return to civilian life a few days later. One of the few women doctors in the United States Army, Captain Hurianek was assigned to the Darnall post in March, 1944 and assumed charge of the women’s ward.

 

Members of the colored Boy Scout Troop No. 154, of Danville, who attended the summer session at Camp Offutt, near Versailles, were awarded a Certificate of Rating at “Superior Troop of Campers.” They were under the leadership of Scoutmaster Matthew Fisher, who was assisted by Josh Shannon.

 

50 YEARS AGO — 1970

 

New teachers who will begin this school year at Boyle County schools are JoNell Glasscock, Phillis Bridge, Mary Joyce Hyden, Becky Sims, Gerry Sharp, Joan Kipp, Charles White, Ray Middletown, Kay Wilder, Ruth Kenney, Diane Fish, Carol McLallen, Charles Baril, Charles Scott, Royce and Christine Killen, Gloria Sisk, Phillis Meadows and Sue Clay.

 

The Board of Directors of the United Community Fund in Danville have agreed on a budget of $64,000 to be financed by its 1970 fund drive. The budget includes $2,500 for the Arthritis Foundation, the first year the foundation has been included in the local drive. In all, 11 agencies will benefit from the drive. The Salvation will receive $15,808; American Red Cross, $13,000; Family Service, $9,350; Boy Scouts, $7,800; Girl Scouts, $4,694; Cerebral Palsy, $2,000; Muscular Dystrophy, $800; USO, $700; Rescue Squad, $3,670; UCF Emergency and Operating Fund, $2,400; and YMCA, $200.

 

Whirlpool’s newest home appliance, the trash compactor, will be manufactured in the new Danville plant which the company plans to have in operation in early 1971. The compactor will be manufactured here instead of the company’s kitchen range.

 

Two Centre College students are under arrest in suburban Reistertown, Maryland, in connection with a fire which destroyed the records at the Reistertown Selective Service office last week. More than 2,000 draft records were destroyed by the fire

 

25 YEARS AGO — 1995

 

David Sparrow is leaving his post as Boyle County agricultural extension agent to become assistant to DR. Oran Little, dean of the College of Agriculture at the University of Kentucky. Sparrow has been ag agent here since 1979.

 

Life’s been rough recently for Guinevere, who moved to Lexington Avenue from Alaska this summer. Last week a man was seen to pull up into the driveway where Guinevere lives, stopped by her mini pool, dumped out the water and loaded the pool into his car and drove away. Guinevere is a Vietnamese pot-bellied pig who used the pool to cool off. Her owner, Sally Bauer, tried to buy another pool, but couldn’t find one since it’s the end of summer. She’s hoping that if the man who took the pool finds out it was used by a pig, he’ll return it.